Some think COVID19 is a hoax

The inconvenient truth of COVID-19 is that it’s going to infect millions and hundreds of thousands will die. That reality is slowing dawning on a majority of Canadian as the virus moves closer to home. However a small minority see it as a hoax, a government plot to invade our daily lives. I’ll call this group the “Illuminati faction.”

A larger minority have politicized what is a health crisis. This group votes for the Conservative Party but I’m reluctant to label them as such. Let’s call them the “political partisans.”

Four million Canadians say the whole crisis is overblown, extrapolating from a poll conducted by Angus Reid on March 30. Twelve per cent of respondents agreed that “the threat of a coronavirus outbreak in Canada is overblown.”

Two-thirds of them voted Conservative in the 2019 federal election.

Other than politics, I can think of no other reason why Conservative voters would regard a health crisis differently than anyone else. The coronavirus does not select victims based on how they vote. Regardless of what they tell pollsters, I suspect that this group is as worried as anyone else.

The official stance Conservation Party is sensible. Conservative leader Andrew Scheer said: “There really isn’t much philosophical difference when it comes to fighting a virus or keeping Canadians healthy and safe (CP, March 22, 2020).”

The motive of the political partisans seems obvious. They are reluctant to give the prime minister any kind of advantage. During a health crisis the prime minister appears statesman-like.

That bump in popularity has certainly worked for Prime Minister Trudeau and to slightly lesser extent for U.S. President Trump. Two-thirds of Canadians think Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is doing a good job handling the COVID-19 crisis. Some provincial leaders have seen even more of a bump. The highest score came for Premier François Legault of Quebec with an approval rating of 93 per cent.

However, the Illuminati faction has more of a populist inclination. They distrust anything that the Mainstream Media (MSM) has to offer which they regard as fake news. The truth is revealed through the blogosphere.

I found two examples of the Illuminati faction on the Facebook page of a Kamloops user.

Henry Makow is the author of Illuminati: The Cult that Hijacked the World. On his website he proposes that governments are part of a sinister plot. His April 3 post warns:

“Flu Psyop — Pretext to Impose Orwellian Dictatorship?” ‘The Depression [resulting from the pandemic] will deepen and an oppressive political regime will be instituted.” “Their goal is take away our freedoms. Then if we want them back, we’ll be forced to receive vaccines to gain a digital certificate of movement which allows us to be tracked on 5G control grids.”

And a YouTube video with 508,068 views as of March 31, 2020, is titled “CoronaHoax Pandemic Proven Fake… Yet The Lockdowns Continue… Here’s Why.”

Like climate change deniers, COVID-19 deniers would prefer to believe some guy blogging from his basement. Unlike climate change, the effects of the virus are not glacial –they are immediate and deadly. And when not deadly, it’s extremely painful with possible permanent damage to the lungs.

Who says irony is dead?

Immigration is shaping up to be an election issue

Immigration could be a toxic issue in the upcoming October federal election.

image: realtimetrump.com

Just the talk of anti-immigration by politicians is enough to trigger attacks on some of society’s most vulnerable members.

When presidential candidate Donald Trump campaigned against immigration, the effect was immediate. Thugs took to the streets. Hate crimes went up 20 per cent in Chicago, 50 per cent in Philadelphia, and 62 per cent in Washington DC. After Trump’s election, the hate crimes continued (hate crimes include attacks against all identifiable groups, not just immigrants.) According to a study from the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism from California State University, the effect persisted after the election with a 13 per cent increase in hate crimes across America’s ten largest cities.

The Conservatives are gearing up the anti-immigration issue. After the Parliamentary Budget Officer warned that asylum-seekers walking across the Canadian-U.S. border at “unauthorized points” could cost the federal government more than $1-billion over three years, Conservative leader Andrew Scheer immediately tweeted: “Parliamentary Budget Officer: Illegal border crossings cost Canadian taxpayers up to $34,000 per person.”

Scheer ramped up the talk further by saying he strongly opposed Mr. Trudeau’s intention to sign a UN agreement on a multinational approach to migration, saying – ominously but incorrectly – “it gives influence over Canada’s immigration to foreign entities.”

Frank Graves of EKOS and Michael Valpy from the University of Toronto wonder who’s buying this talk: “So why is this happening? For whom is Mr. Scheer beating the drum? (Globe and Mail, December 18, 2018).”

There has been a shift in public opinion on immigration, perhaps fuelled by anti-immigration anger in Europe and the U.S. and rage-about-everything on social media.

Frank and Valpy are puzzled: “On the suddenly inflammatory topic of immigration, Canada has become a paradox.”

In ordinary times, Canadians support immigration. But peel away the anti-immigration rhetoric and you find racism at its core. EKOS research indicates that on the surface, rationales are sensible. Canadians favour immigrants that arrive in an orderly fashion, as opposed to those who arrive unannounced at borders or walk across the border, by ten percent. Not a great difference when you consider the attention that border-crossers get. However, when researchers asked whether they’d prefer to live beside a white newcomer from Europe or brown or black newcomers from somewhere else, “the differences balloon to 200 to 300 percentage points.”

Conservatives tapped into this irrational fear of the other when they ran an ad depicting a black man walking toward the border with his suitcase on little wheels from the U.S. They withdrew the ad but the message lingers: dark-skinned immigrants are scary.

Will racism disguised as anti-immigration bring the Conservatives to power? They will have to tap into fear in supporters from other parties. As it now stands, 40 per cent of Canadians think there are too many visible minorities being admitted to Canada. Of those, 65 per cent identify as Conservative supporters, 20 per cent as New Democrats, and 13 per cent as Liberals.

Perhaps the Conservatives can recruit the fear-mongers organized on Facebook under the banner of “Yellow Vests Canada” which has 107,000 members.